How to Redesign a Logo


There are a number of reasons a brand might need to redesign its logo, but whatever the reason, they’ll need an experienced graphic designer on their team. From studying your client’s industry to nailing down initial concepts, we provide a clear roadmap for designers and creatives who are looking to make redesigning logos a part of their creative arsenal.


Client Research

Whether you’re redesigning a logo or simply drafting one from scratch, you’ll need a firm understanding of your client and their specific needs. What is their mission, how do they view themselves and their product or service? You might consider some of the following questions:

  • What problem are they trying to solve with the logo?

  • What message do they want the logo to convey?

  • What makes their brand unique or sets them apart from their competitors?

  • Using a few clear descriptors, how would they describe their brand?

For a logo redesign, you’ll want some additional perspective as well. What exactly about the client’s current logo do they feel is off? What sort of message do they think the old logo is conveying, and what’s wrong with that message? Are there aspects of the current logo that need to stay or go?


Drafting and Feedback

For a redesign, variety is key when you’re starting out. Draft a number of quick, small sketches, trying your best to think freely as you do it. Begin with 20 or 30 quick sketches, then create another series of 20 or 30 quick sketches, working in a different direction. Experiment with as many design concepts as you can.


When you’re ready, settle on a handful of sketches that speak to you the most, and then develop them into roughs that you can then present to the client. At this point, the client may choose a single rough that they want you to continue with, or they might request that you develop a few of the roughs. Multiple rounds of feedback are common at this stage, so don’t sweat it.


Draft Logo Guidelines

A standard part of any logo design process, drafting the logo guidelines entails setting up a clear understanding of how the logo will be used to ensure brand image consistency. Specific color changes or logo sizes might be deemed unacceptable for whatever reason. Understandably, drafting the logo guidelines for a logo redesign is slightly more complicated, as you’ll want to ensure brand image consistency while also maintaining some distance between the old logo and your redesign.


Final Tips

For the most part, designing and redesigning a logo are going to be pretty similar processes. That said, there are a few things to keep in mind as you work to redesign a client’s logo.

  • Give your client time. Depending on the brand and personalities involved, a logo redesign can be a dramatic decision, one the brand naturally wants to take its time with. If you can, be flexible when the client is choosing between final redesigns.

  • Keep your eyes on the prize. It’s tempting to constantly refer back to the client’s old logo to check your progress, but doing so can easily prevent you from settling on the fresh perspective that the client wants and needs.